Business Knowledge

4 Tips for Getting Your Business Through Tough Times

4 Tips for Getting Your Business Through Tough Times

If you’re a small business owner whose company hasn’t gone through hard times, that’s great but it’s likely to happen at some point. As much as we dream about being brilliant enough at business that we’ll never face slow times, there are many things beyond our control that can negatively affect our business.

Here are four tips for getting your business through difficult periods so you can look forward to many more years of business ownership.

How to set payment terms if you’re a freelancer or contractor

How to set payment terms if you’re a freelancer or contractor

Following up on late or non-paying customers is no freelancer’s favorite task. Which is precisely why you need to set payment terms up front – and in writing – before you work with a new client or customer.

By communicating and agreeing on the non-negotiables for doing business with you, you’ll avoid awkward misunderstandings, frustrating disputes, and in most cases, the ugly hassle of debt collection.

These tips will help you pave the way for consistent cash flow by setting clear payment terms.

Getting the Work–Life Balance Right

Getting the Work–Life Balance Right

As a small business owner it’s hard to juggle your work and outside responsibilities. It’s important to run your business effectively and still have a life outside the office.

You need a good balance between work and play for your health and well-being. Small business owners often fall into the trap of working too hard, ending up exhausted from the constant work demands associated with self-employment.

Strengthening your balance sheet

Strengthening your balance sheet

Your balance sheet (now more correctly called a Statement of Financial Position) reveals a great deal about your business, including the total value of your assets – the things you own; how much you owe to others – your liabilities; and the level of your solvency.

These three aspects will be studied carefully by lenders and investors − and by buyers if you intend to sell your business. But they should also be important to you, because it’s important to be solvent at all times. In other words, you need to have more assets than liabilities available to pay your debts.

If you can’t pay bills when they fall due, your business may be technically insolvent. Fortunately two simple tests can quickly reveal your solvency.